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What Is Prevnar 13? Uses, Side Effects, Interactions

What is Prevnar 13?

Prevnar 13 vaccine is used to prevent infection caused by pneumococcal bacteria. Prevnar 13 contains 13 different types of pneumococcal bacteria.

Pneumococcal disease is a serious infection caused by a bacteria. Pneumococcal bacteria can infect the sinuses and inner ear. It can also infect the lungs, blood, and brain, and these conditions can be fatal.

Prevnar 13 works by exposing you to a small amount of the bacteria or a protein from the bacteria, which causes the body to develop immunity to the disease. Prevnar 13 will not treat an active infection that has already developed in the body.

Prevnar 13 is for use in children from 6 weeks to 5 years old, and in adults who are 50 and older.

Becoming infected with pneumococcal disease (such as pneumonia or meningitis) is much more dangerous to your health than receiving Prevnar 13. However, like any medicine, Prevnar 13 can cause side effects but the risk of serious side effects is extremely low.

Like any vaccine, Prevnar 13 may not provide protection from disease in every person.

Prevnar 13 (Pneumococcal 13-valent conjugate vaccine [diphtheria CRM197 protein]) suspension for intramuscular injection is indicated for active immunization for the prevention of disease caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae. In adults 50 years and older, Prevnar 13 is used to immunize against pneumococcal pneumonia and invasive disease. In adults, antibody responses to Prevnar 13 were diminished when given with inactivated Influenza Virus Vaccine. In children 6 weeks through 5 years of age, Prevnar 13 is used to immunize against invasive pneumococcal disease and otitis media. In adults aged 50 years and older, common side effects of Prevnar 13 include:

  • fatigue,
  • tired feeling,
  • headache,
  • muscle pain,
  • joint pain,
  • decreased appetite,
  • injection site reactions (pain, redness, swelling, tenderness, or a hard lump),
  • limitation of arm movement,
  • chills,
  • skin rash,
  • tired feeling,
  • drowsiness,
  • sleeping more or less than usual,
  • vomiting,
  • diarrhea, or
  • low grade fever (102 degrees or less).
  • In infants and toddlers, common side effects of Prevnar 13 include the above, and:
  • crying,
  • fussiness

Children 6 weeks through 5 years should receive a four-dose immunization series. Adults 50 years and older should receive a single dose. The safety and effectiveness of Prevnar 13 in pregnant women have not been established. It is not known whether this vaccine is excreted in human milk. Prevnar 13 may interact with steroids, chemotherapy or radiation, medicines to treat or prevent organ transplant rejection, and medications to treat psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, or other autoimmune disorders. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use, and all vaccines you recently received. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

Our Prevnar 13 (Pneumococcal 13-valent Conjugate Vaccine [Diphtheria CRM197 Protein]) Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

Important information

For children, Prevnar 13 vaccine is given in a series of shots. The first shot is usually given when the child is 2 months old. The booster shots are then given at 4 months, 6 months, and 12 to 15 months of age. Adults usually receive only one dose of the vaccine.

In a child older than 6 months who has not yet received Prevnar 13, the first dose can be given any time from the age of 7 months through 5 years (before the 6th birthday).

If the child is less than 1 year old at the time of the first Prevnar 13 shot, he or she will need 2 booster doses. If the child is 12 to 23 months old at the time of the first shot, he or she will need 1 booster dose. A child who is 2 years or older at the time of the first shot may need only the one shot and no booster doses.

The timing of a vaccination with Prevnar 13 is very important for it to be effective. Your child’s individual booster schedule may be different from these guidelines. Follow your doctor’s instructions or the schedule recommended by the health department of the state you live in. Keep track of any and all side effects your child has after receiving Prevnar 13. When the child receives a booster dose, you will need to tell the doctor if the previous shot caused any side effects.

You can still receive a vaccine if you have a minor cold. In the case of a more severe illness with a fever or any type of infection, wait until you get better before receiving Prevnar 13.

Becoming infected with pneumococcal disease (such as pneumonia or meningitis) is much more dangerous to your health than receiving Prevnar 13. However, like any medicine, this vaccine can cause side effects but the risk of serious side effects is extremely low.

Be sure to keep your child on a regular schedule for other immunizations against diseases such as diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), measles, mumps, hepatitis, or varicella (chicken pox). Your doctor or state health department can provide you with a recommended immunization schedule.

Before receiving Prevnar 13

Keep track of any and all side effects your child has after receiving Prevnar 13. When the child receives a booster dose, you will need to tell the doctor if the previous shot caused any side effects. You should not receive Prevnar 13 if you ever had a severe allergic reaction to a pneumococcal or diphtheria vaccine.

Before your child receives Prevnar 13, tell your doctor if the child was born prematurely.

To make sure you or your child can safely receive Prevnar 13, tell your doctor if you or your child have any of these other conditions:

  • a bleeding or blood clotting disorder such as hemophilia or easy bruising; or
  • a weak immune system caused by disease, bone marrow transplant, or by using certain medicines or receiving cancer treatments.

side effects

Your child should not receive a booster vaccine if he or she had a life-threatening allergic reaction after the first Prevnar 13 shot. Keep track of any and all side effects your child has after receiving Prevnar 13. When the child receives a booster dose, you will need to tell the doctor if the previous shot caused any side effects. Get emergency medical help if your child has any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Prevnar 13: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat.

  • high fever (103 degrees or higher);
  • seizure (convulsions);
  • wheezing, trouble breathing;
  • severe stomach pain, severe vomiting or diarrhea;
  • easy bruising or bleeding; or
  • severe pain, itching, irritation, or skin changes where the shot was given.
  • Less serious Prevnar 13 side effects include
  • crying, fussiness;
  • headache, tired feeling;
  • muscle or joint pain;
  • drowsiness, sleeping more or less than usual;
  • mild redness, swelling, tenderness, or a hard lump where the shot was given;
  • loss of appetite, mild vomiting or diarrhea;
  • low fever (102 degrees or less), chills; or
  • mild skin rash.

PREVNAR 13® should not be given to anyone with a severe allergic reaction to any component of PREVNAR 13® or any diphtheria toxoid–containing vaccine. Adults with weakened immune systems (eg, HIV infection, leukemia) may have a reduced immune response. In adults, immune responses to PREVNAR 13®were reduced when given with injected seasonal flu vaccine.

What other drugs will affect Prevnar 13?

Before receiving Prevnar 13, tell the doctor about all other vaccines you or your child have recently received.

Also tell the doctor if you or your child have recently received drugs or treatments that can weaken the immune system, including:

  • an oral, nasal, inhaled, or injectable steroid medicine;
  • chemotherapy or radiation;
  • medications to treat psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, or other autoimmune disorders, such as azathioprine (Imuran), etanercept (Enbrel), leflunomide (Arava), and others; or
  • medicines to treat or prevent organ transplant rejection, such as basiliximab (Simulect), cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral, Gengraf), muromonab CD3 (Orthoclone), mycophenolate mofetil (CellCept), sirolimus (Rapamune), or tacrolimus (Prograf).

If you are using any of these medications, you may not be able to receive the vaccine, or may need to wait until the other treatments are finished.

There may be other drugs that can interact with Prevnar 13. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

This medication work?

Immunization with the pneumcocccal vaccine requires 1 to 4 doses of the vaccine, depending on your age at the first dose. This vaccine may be given at the same time as other routine vaccinations.

The vaccine will be injected into a muscle (preferably in the thigh or upper, outer arm) by a qualified health professional.

Many things can affect the dose of a medication that a person needs, such as body weight, other medical conditions, and other medications. Your doctor may recommend a dose different from the ones listed here.

It is important this medication be given exactly as recommended by your doctor. If you miss an appointment to receive the pneumococcal vaccine, contact your doctor as soon as possible to reschedule your appointment. Add all vaccines you receive to your immunization record.

The vaccine should be kept in a refrigerator until it is ready to be used. Keep it out of the reach of children.

Do not dispose of medications in wastewater (e.g. down the sink or in the toilet) or in household garbage. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medications that are no longer needed or have expired.

warnings 

Before you begin using a medication, be sure to inform your doctor of any medical conditions or allergies you may have, any medications you are taking, whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and any other significant facts about your health. These factors may affect how you should use this medication.

Latex allergy: If you are allergic to latex, check with your doctor before receiving this vaccine. Some forms of the vaccine may contain latex.

Medical conditions: Parents of children who were born prematurely or have problems with blood clotting or bleeding, a weakened immune system (due to conditions such as HIV, cancer, spleen problems, or medications that suppress the immune system such as those used for cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, or organ transplants) should discuss with their doctor how this vaccine may affect their child’s medical condition, how their child’s medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this vaccine, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

Vaccine protection: As with any vaccine, this vaccine may not protect 100% of people who receive it.

Pregnancy: Studies of the effects of this vaccine during pregnancy have not been done. This vaccine should not be used during pregnancy unless the benefits outweigh the risks. If you become pregnant while using this medication, contact your doctor immediately.

Breast-feeding: It is not known if the vaccine passes into breast milk.. If you are a breast-feeding mother and are taking this vaccine, it may affect your baby. Talk to your doctor about whether you should continue breast-feeding.

Children: This vaccine is not recommended for infants under the age of 6 weeks.

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